Single and gay

For other men, casual partners get in the way of finding a serious partner. You like having a boyfriend, not him, per se. You are worthy of love. Nobody is perfect, trust me. Sure, you should work on ways to better yourself, but in all honesty, unless you really are a despicable piece of poop, you are worthy of love.

You still have some hangups about being gay. You might not realize them. They might be slightly under the conscious surface, but they are there, and they are inhibiting you from having an intimate relationship with another man. You believe that committed relationships are for boring, straight people.

That queers must be having sex with everyone in order to be queer. Kind of like how Brian Kinney thought on Queer as Folk. This will obviously hinder you from having a meaningful, more committed relationship.

This is tough. It is hard to find same-sex couples who have been together for decades.

That said, they do exist, and you should do your best to find and befriend these men. Because of this, they struggle to reveal their true selves to others. They struggle and fear intimacy. Sex, however, is important to a committed relationship. It should not every time, but at least sometimes be an expression of love with your partner. You should never let go of your values to satisfy the needs of someone else. All Rights Reserved. You have an unreasonable checklist He needs to be Ivy League-educated, tall, handsome, funny, caring, understanding, have a good relationship with his parents, a solid friend group, making more than k per year, and hung like a horse.

Roy and Joan were similarly uneasy when a friend back in England alerted them that he had seen a helicopter hovering near Sealand. Their sinking feeling was justified. Michael tried to wrench himself free, his hair falling in his eyes as he was dragged into the room and shut behind a steel door. The only possible way out was a porthole window, but it was far too small for an adult to fit through. Michael was left in the room for three days, keeping himself warm by wrapping himself in a Sealandic flag.

Eventually, the captors threw Michael onto a boat, which deposited him in the Netherlands, with no money and no passport. A sympathetic skipper helped him get back to England, where he linked back up with his parents. But Michael explained his ordeal. Holding the Fort. The family quickly decided that the only possible response was to recapture the fort. They gathered some rough-and-tumble friends and a few guns, and enlisted the talents of a pilot friend who had flown helicopters in a James Bond film.

The plan was to fly to the fort, rappel down ropes, and retake the Principality by force. Attacking at dawn, they descended from the sky, fired a single shot from a sawed-off shotgun, and tossed the captors into the brig. A tribunal was established to try the invaders. Britain shrugged its shoulders when asked to intervene, saying the fort was not on its property. The Germans retreated back home after the failed coup and established the Sealandic government-in-exile, a dark mirror version of the Principality that persists to the present day.

T he government-in-exile disavowed any role in the late s Spanish passport scam. They were arrested when they tried to cross into Italy. The money had in fact come from a gambling enterprise in Poland, but it was an aboveboard operation. Did we recognize these passports or not? For a time in , after Slovenia was briefly caught up in the Bosnian war, many countries refused to recognize our nation. Achenbach was 79 when he filed the lawsuit in , and he succumbed to old age in the middle of the litigation at age The strange legal and financial quagmire was a fitting final chapter in the life of someone who had spent his whole life involved in dubious ways to get money.

Today, however, the Principality does offer a legitimate way to become a citizen of Sealand.

The Bates family sells royal titles, an official business whose proceeds go only to funding the honest initiatives of the true Sealandic government. Costs vary: Prince Roy and Princess Joan passed into the next realm in and , respectively, but the country is going strong more than five decades after it was founded.

Michael takes only intermittent trips out to the fort these days, but Sealand is always occupied by at least one armed caretaker, lest any of the events of its bellicose history repeat themselves. The government-in-exile is still going strong as well, led by Prime Minister Johannes W.

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Seiger since a constitutional amendment transferred power from Achenbach in Seiger asked this writer if I could put him in touch with Donald Trump to help him with his quest, canceling further contact when I was unable to do so. Fifty years ago, John Trudell overcame tragedy to become the national voice for Native Americans—and a model for a new generation of activists.

H e sat at the same table each evening, sometimes with lighting and sometimes without, a cigarette often in hand, a guest always by his side. In the background, the sound of waves rolling against the rocks and the stuttering of a backup generator were constants. Then, with a crackly yet true radio connection, streaming through the wires from an unthinkable place — Alcatraz Island — he began speaking in a calm, determined voice. The nation was listening.

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In the Pacifica Radio Archives, located in a modest brick building in North Hollywood, you can hear what hundreds of thousands of Americans heard on those evenings. File through the cassettes and you will find more than a dozen tapes labeled with a single word: Each is followed by a date, anywhere from December to August But these were not simply programs about Alcatraz, that island in the notoriously frigid San Francisco Bay that was home to a federal prison until it closed in Rather, they were broadcast from the former prison building itself, from a small cell without heat and only a lone generator for power rumbling in the background.

By the winter of , Trudell could be found in that austere cell, speaking over the rush of waves in a composed Midwestern accent. Why would the FBI compose its longest dossier about a broadcaster speaking from a rocky island a mile offshore? What was Trudell saying that frightened them so much? Trudell was advocating for Native American self-determination, explaining its moral and political importance to all Americans. On air, he often revealed the innumerable ways the government was violating Native American rights: He imagined a future in which equality — between different American cultures, and between all people and the earth itself — would become a reality.

And for the first time, non—Native American communities were listening. More than , people tuned in to Pacifica stations in California, Texas and New York to hear his weekly broadcast. At just 23 years old, with long brown hair and hanging earrings, Trudell had one thing the FBI could not stop: The organization pointed to the Treaty of Fort Laramie, which provided that all surplus federal land be returned to native tribes. It had been unoccupied since President Kennedy closed the federal prison in By inhabiting the 12 acres of Alcatraz, IOAT hoped to set a precedent for the reclamation of hundreds of thousands of unclaimed acres across the United States.

But there was an obstacle: That all changed on the night of November Under the cover of darkness and a dense blanket of fog, 79 activists from more than 20 tribes sailed from Sausalito across the frigid bay and settled on the island. The Indians have landed! A gathering was held that night at 2 a.

Governing teams were also established. Onshore allies knew the landing had succeeded when they saw a bright yellow Morse code message blinking through the mist: J ohn Trudell was not on those initial voyages. At the time, he had just returned from deployment in Vietnam, enrolled in San Bernardino Valley College, and moved in with his girlfriend, Fenicia Lou Ordonez. When he learned of the landing on Alcatraz, he suggested they join in.

Expecting to join for only a few weeks, they packed sleeping bags, headed six hours north, and hitched a ride across the emerald bay on one of the IOAT-operated vessels, many of which were typically used for fishing and shipping. What was once a treacherous journey with fierce Coast Guard resistance was now readily accessible, but not because the government had become any more benevolent. Fearing a public backlash, federal authorities called off the Coast Guard from intervening in these voyages.


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Soon after docking on the island, Trudell attended the daily island meeting of IOAT leaders and tribal heads. He pointed out that if they truly wanted to make a case for the Native American right to reclaim unused land, they urgently needed to reshape the narrative. On his drive to the Bay Area, Trudell had seen national papers like The New York Times and San Francisco Chronicle running stories portraying the occupation as a Native American theft — rather than a reclamation of what was stolen from them.

He asked himself: December 26, For the next 30 minutes, Trudell led conversations with Native American activists, spiritualists and students — many of whom were living on the island, visiting as volunteers, or ferrying supplies. It was called Radio Free Alcatraz , and Trudell typically began episodes by describing challenges on the island.

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There were many: Alcatraz had shaky electricity, a dearth of clean water, and it was frequently hit by strong offshore storms. And Saturday, we were stranded on the island because of bad weather. Despite these immediate challenges, Trudell — often clad in a wide-collared button-down underneath an emblazoned leather jacket — spoke both with the equanimity of a captain reporting to headquarters and the kindness of a good friend.

In an interview with KPFA host Al Silbowitz in December , Trudell sketched a portrait of life on the island and outlined the purpose of the occupation. This struggle was not unique to this moment. It was experienced daily by native tribes everywhere. We have a chance to unite the American Indian people as they never had the opportunity to do.

In a conversation with Al Silbowitz, Trudell explains how the difficult conditions on Alcatraz all too closely resemble life on so many Native American reservations. The heart of the program was his intimate voice — masterful at revealing the aspirational humanity that defined the movement, while outlining the enduring goal of activists to construct a university and Native American cultural center.